I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp  by Richard Hell
Look, I loved Patti Smith’s Just Kids as much as the next music nerd. But I love this book even more. It’s less sentimental & affected, much funnier, and sharp as a hypodermic needle. There’s also a lot more sex and drugs to go with the rock’n’roll. Hell presents the events of his crooked life with candor and wit, and in doing so paints an extraordinarily vivid picture of a strange and wonderful moment in music history, as well as of a long-lost New York City where you could live on odd jobs, have dinner with Susan Sontag, and party with Iggy. Hell’s remarkable intelligence and articulacy shine most in his lucid, insightful discussions of the punk movement, the cultural milieu that produced it, and the wrecked lives we associate with it. A splendid, wicked ride.
-Alex

I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp  by Richard Hell

Look, I loved Patti Smith’s Just Kids as much as the next music nerd. But I love this book even more. It’s less sentimental & affected, much funnier, and sharp as a hypodermic needle. There’s also a lot more sex and drugs to go with the rock’n’roll. Hell presents the events of his crooked life with candor and wit, and in doing so paints an extraordinarily vivid picture of a strange and wonderful moment in music history, as well as of a long-lost New York City where you could live on odd jobs, have dinner with Susan Sontag, and party with Iggy. Hell’s remarkable intelligence and articulacy shine most in his lucid, insightful discussions of the punk movement, the cultural milieu that produced it, and the wrecked lives we associate with it. A splendid, wicked ride.

-Alex

monkeybusinessmag:

Monkey Business International Vol. 4 debuted last weekend in Japan at the Tokyo International Literary Festival. The magazine’s founding editor, Motoyuki Shibata, and contributors Brian Evenson, David Peace and Tomoka Shibasaki gave readings and talks at several Tokyo venues.

Brian Evenson…

We’ve got this in-store now and some of us (Tom and Alicia) are kinda losing our minds over it.

So, you’re kicking yourself for not coming to see Richard Hell last night. And you did miss out, no doubt about it. But, there’s hope for you yet! We have ~12 signed copies of his book that would look great in your messenger bag.

So, you’re kicking yourself for not coming to see Richard Hell last night. And you did miss out, no doubt about it. But, there’s hope for you yet! We have ~12 signed copies of his book that would look great in your messenger bag.

"And, though rock and roll is about being cool, you don’t have to be cool to make real rock and roll — sometimes the most innocuous and pathetic fumblers only become grace by the way they shine in songs. And this is half of what makes the music the art of adolescence — that it doesn’t require any verifiable skill. It’s all essence, and it’s available to those who, to all appearances, have nothing."

Richard Hell, in I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp

See Richard Hell discuss his book TONIGHT 3/14 at 6pm 57th Street Books

A chin for every witticism; or, Oscar Wilde through the eyes of Zuleika Dobson author Max Beerbohm
pic via Flavorwire

A chin for every witticism; or, Oscar Wilde through the eyes of Zuleika Dobson author Max Beerbohm

pic via Flavorwire

"I was in great difficulty. An urgent journey was facing me. A seriously ill man was waiting for me in a village ten miles distant. A severe snowstorm filled the space between him and me. I had a carriage—a light one, with large wheels, entirely suitable for our country roads. Wrapped up in furs with the bag of instruments in my hand, I was already standing in the courtyard ready for the journey; but the horse was missing—the horse. My own horse had died the previous night, as a result of over exertion in this icy winter. My servant girl was at that very moment running around the village to see if she could borrow a horse, but it was hopeless—I knew that—and I stood there useless, increasingly covered with snow, becoming all the time more immobile."

Franz Kafka, “The Country Doctor”

The bleak world of Kafka, now with more snow.

"Amanda left in January. There was snow on the ground the morning she called, a whiteness that turned gray and filthy by noon and then disappeared down the sewer grates. Later that morning the florist called about the bouquet you ordered for her return. Everything becomes symbol and irony when you have been betrayed."
— Jay McInerney, Bright Lights, Big City
"

I stood there, listening. The wind blew snow from the branches. Snow blew out of the woods in eddies and sweeping gusts. I raised my collar, put my gloves back on. When the air was still again, I walked among the stones, trying to read the names and dates, adjusting the flags to make them swing free. Then I stood and listened.

The power of the dead is that we think they see us all the time. The dead have a presence. Is there a level of energy composed solely of the dead? They are also in the ground, of course, asleep and crumbling. Perhaps we are what they dream.

May the days be aimless. Let the seasons drift. Do not advance the action according to a plan.

"
— Don DeLillo, White Noise
"Next morning I awoke, looked out the window and nearly died of fright. My screams brought Atticus from his bathroom half-shaven.
“The world’s endin‘, Atticus! Please do something—!” I dragged him to the window and pointed.
“No it’s not,” he said. “It’s snowing.”
Jem asked Atticus would it keep up. Jem had never seen snow either, but he knew what it was. Atticus said he didn’t know any more about snow than Jem did. “I think, though, if it’s watery like that, it’ll turn to rain.”"

Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Aye, we know how you feel, Scout.

"A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It had begun to snow again. He watched sleepily the flakes, silver and dark, falling obliquely against the lamplight. The time had come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was falling on every part of the dark central plain, on the treeless hills, falling softly upon the Bog of Allen and, farther westward, softly falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling, too, upon every part of the lonely churchyard on the hill where Michael Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."
— James Joyce, “The Dead” from Dubliners

Keith Richards: pirate, Rolling Stone, alive against all odds… coming soon to the kids’ books section!

Mr. Richards’s “Gus & Me: The Story of My Granddad and My First Guitar,” will be published on Sept. 9.

Would you like to read some excellent books in translation? How about 25 of the very best?

believermag:

Poets’ Bookshelves. An ongoing series of posts documenting some of the books collected by our favorite poets. This week: Michael Robbins, author of Alien vs. Predator (Penguin, 2012). His second volume of poems, The Second Sex, will be published by Penguin in the fall. 

See more from this series.

michaelrobbinspoet is a long-time Seminary/57th Street shopper, so some of those books are almost certainly plucked from our shelves.

This is just the coolest thing we’ve seen all day.

Are you satisfied with the representation of women in the media? Do we hear from enough different voices, do we talk about the right issues, have we made enough progress? ARE YOU SATISFIED?!?! Think about it. Read about it. Celebrate Women’s History Month with books from our window display, which also features some completely ridiculous ads, a hairbrush that looks like a mace, and the all-important question written in lipstick. 
Complete list of books & ordering info: http://www.semcoop.com/womens-history-month-adult

Are you satisfied with the representation of women in the media? Do we hear from enough different voices, do we talk about the right issues, have we made enough progress? ARE YOU SATISFIED?!?! Think about it. Read about it. Celebrate Women’s History Month with books from our window display, which also features some completely ridiculous ads, a hairbrush that looks like a mace, and the all-important question written in lipstick. 

Complete list of books & ordering info: http://www.semcoop.com/womens-history-month-adult