"And yet love, which is selfishness in duplicate, sacrifices everything for itself, exists on lies." 

- Raymond Radiguet in DEVIL IN THE FLESH from Melville House’s delicious NEVERSINK LIBRARY

unabridgedbookstore:

We played host to a Small Press Night for local book people (and some that were in town for MLA) so that some amazing small presses could enchant us with their amazing books. It worked! Charmed.

The people (from top to bottom):
The dashing Nick During from NYRB CLASSICS
The darling Jeff Waxman, from OTHER PRESS.
The dynamic Patrick Thomas from MILKWEED EDITIONS
The dapper Declan Spring from NEW DIRECTION
The dauntless Jeremy M. Davies from DALKEY ARCHIVE PRESS
And The distinctive Chad Post from OPEN LETTER BOOKS

Hey thanks Unabridged for being such excellent hosts the other night! We think we speak for all attendees in saying that there are some really exciting titles coming at you from ALL of these presses. Check their sites & come running for the books on our shelves.

Scenes from last night’s spectacular TALES FROM THE PUNCH BOWL at the Punch House in Pilsen. We heard from poets Russ Woods & Daniela Olszewska as well as novelist Anne Marie Wirth Cauchon. We listened, laughed, and mingled. We drank potent punch. We walked through a doorway concealed with a bookshelf to get to the event space. We plan on doing this again.

Best of/year end lists: OUT

Previews/teasers/OMG I CAN’T WAIT FORs: IN

tagged → #the millions #2014
otherpress:

OP matchbook, made by Lauren Reese of @citylit_books

otherpress:

OP matchbook, made by Lauren Reese of @citylit_books

A mittened salute to fellow Chiberia-dwellers Curbside Splendor! This shelf of our small press shrine is dedicated to them. If you haven’t checked out their stuff, you really, really should:
Meaty by Samantha Irby
Citizen J by Daniela Olszewka
Tomorrowland by Joseph Bates
Kiss as Many Women as You Can by Franki Elliot & Shawn Stucky
Zero Fade by Chris L. Terry

A mittened salute to fellow Chiberia-dwellers Curbside Splendor! This shelf of our small press shrine is dedicated to them. If you haven’t checked out their stuff, you really, really should:

Meaty by Samantha Irby

Citizen J by Daniela Olszewka

Tomorrowland by Joseph Bates

Kiss as Many Women as You Can by Franki Elliot & Shawn Stucky

Zero Fade by Chris L. Terry

Do you all have cabin fever yet? Break out of your igloos Thursday and head to Punch House for the first ever TALES FROM THE PUNCHBOWL, featuring drinks (I hear they have hot punch…) and great literature via some of our favorite small presses, Curbside Splendor Publishing and Two Dollar Radio. This is something you really, really don’t want to miss, so we’ll make sure to remind you over the next few days, too.

One of our booksellers, Jeff Waxman, is working his last shift at the store today (seems the weather is making the argument for him to stay: proven by the slushy window display of some of Jeff’s favorite staff recs, handsells, and what-have-you).

Jeff has worked here in some capacity for the last 6 years and in that time has handsold hundreds of books, invented 5 or 6 different ice cream floats (yeah, we have float days over the summer; it’s a hard life), and affected the store in countless ways.

He’s been a phenomenal bookseller, a great coworker, and a good friend. We will miss him (you’re very lucky to get him Other Press), but his staff recs and his influence on his coworkers and the customers that sought him out will remain.

Goodbye…for now, Jeff.

Happy New Years from 57th St Books! We know January can be a bit of a downer, what with the holidays over and -50 windchills around the corner, but at least we have British crime & costume dramas to keep us afloat! In honor of the return of Downton Abbey & Sherlock this month, we put together a window display of related literature, from a “downstairs” history of England to a collection of Victorian crime writing featuring female protagonists. Find a complete list of titles here: http://www.semcoop.com/sherlock-holmesdownton-abbey-0

Happy New Years from 57th St Books! We know January can be a bit of a downer, what with the holidays over and -50 windchills around the corner, but at least we have British crime & costume dramas to keep us afloat! In honor of the return of Downton Abbey & Sherlock this month, we put together a window display of related literature, from a “downstairs” history of England to a collection of Victorian crime writing featuring female protagonists. Find a complete list of titles here: http://www.semcoop.com/sherlock-holmesdownton-abbey-0

“

I’d have a tough time classifying Hawthorn & Child as a literary detective novel (I mean, if we’re labeling things, which we probably shouldn’t, but too late on that front). Sure, the titular characters (who are almost more ghostly presences than anything else) are Scotland Yard detectives and, yeah, crimes and general shady goings-on are peered at through various darkened glasses, but…
There’s something about the novel that knocks around the head for some time after. A quieting of sunshine, a slanted look at the everyday. And the slow ecstasy of the prose and its dark sense of humor.
If we’re doing labels, I guess we’d have to call it gothic? Maybe? Or just incredibly, stunningly beautiful.”
- Tom

I’d have a tough time classifying Hawthorn & Child as a literary detective novel (I mean, if we’re labeling things, which we probably shouldn’t, but too late on that front). Sure, the titular characters (who are almost more ghostly presences than anything else) are Scotland Yard detectives and, yeah, crimes and general shady goings-on are peered at through various darkened glasses, but…

There’s something about the novel that knocks around the head for some time after. A quieting of sunshine, a slanted look at the everyday. And the slow ecstasy of the prose and its dark sense of humor.

If we’re doing labels, I guess we’d have to call it gothic? Maybe? Or just incredibly, stunningly beautiful.”

- Tom