This logo would also look great on crappy pens, mugs with undersized handles, & beer cozies.
(Image via Cromwell Belden Public Library)

This logo would also look great on crappy pens, mugs with undersized handles, & beer cozies.

(Image via Cromwell Belden Public Library)

Happy 89th birthday to everyone’s favorite high school assigned reading/great American novel candidate, The Great Gatsby! Seeing as it’s throwback Thursday, let’s take it way back and celebrate with the only surviving footage from the ORIGINAL film adaption of Gatsby, ca 1926.

Inappropriate Behavior
by Murray Farish, published by milkweedbooksIf I told you that Murray Farish is a lot like George Saunders, but maybe better, would you buy this book? If I told you that he might just be the literary voice of the Great Recession, the spokesman for the subjective experience of class struggle in a post-Occupy world, a rogue tragicomedian of the Drone War era, would this collection find a place on your shelf? These stories are tales of violence, despair, and the desperate struggle for dignity that go beyond the present moment, exploring the ongoing effects of the disparity and delusions that are such an integral part of American life, but which we try so hard to ignore. As this collection points out, it’s about damn time we start paying attention.
-Alex
Ordering info: Inappropriate Behavior by Murray Farish

Inappropriate Behavior

by Murray Farish, published by milkweedbooks

If I told you that Murray Farish is a lot like George Saunders, but maybe better, would you buy this book? If I told you that he might just be the literary voice of the Great Recession, the spokesman for the subjective experience of class struggle in a post-Occupy world, a rogue tragicomedian of the Drone War era, would this collection find a place on your shelf? These stories are tales of violence, despair, and the desperate struggle for dignity that go beyond the present moment, exploring the ongoing effects of the disparity and delusions that are such an integral part of American life, but which we try so hard to ignore. As this collection points out, it’s about damn time we start paying attention.

-Alex

Ordering info: Inappropriate Behavior by Murray Farish

Photographer Bryan David Griffith toured the country last summer, documenting indie bookstores & talking to the people who work there. “The Last Bookstores” is the photo series that resulted. Photos of 57th Street start at slide 54!

Enter here for poetry.

Enter here for poetry.

theparisreview:

“I had scarcely begun when I realized that what I had here at the very least was the Great American Novel. I sent off the first 150 pages to [agent Bernice Baumgarten] and hung around the post office for the next two weeks. At last an answer came. It read as follows: ‘Dear Peter, James Fenimore Cooper wrote this 150 years ago, only he wrote it better, Yours, Bernice.’ On a later occasion, when as a courtesy I sent her the commission on a short story sold in England, she responded unforgettably: ‘Dear Peter, I’m awfully glad you were able to get rid of this story in Europe, as I don’t think we’d have had much luck with it here. Yours, Bernice.’ Both these communications, quoted in their entirety, are burned into my brain forever—doubtless a salutary experience for a brash young writer. I never heard an encouraging word until the day Bernice retired, when she called me in and barked like a Zen master, ‘I’ve been tough on you because you’re very, very good.’ I wanted to sink down and embrace her knees.”
Peter Matthiessen, on his first novel.

theparisreview:

“I had scarcely begun when I realized that what I had here at the very least was the Great American Novel. I sent off the first 150 pages to [agent Bernice Baumgarten] and hung around the post office for the next two weeks. At last an answer came. It read as follows: ‘Dear Peter, James Fenimore Cooper wrote this 150 years ago, only he wrote it better, Yours, Bernice.’ On a later occasion, when as a courtesy I sent her the commission on a short story sold in England, she responded unforgettably: ‘Dear Peter, I’m awfully glad you were able to get rid of this story in Europe, as I don’t think we’d have had much luck with it here. Yours, Bernice.’ Both these communications, quoted in their entirety, are burned into my brain forever—doubtless a salutary experience for a brash young writer. I never heard an encouraging word until the day Bernice retired, when she called me in and barked like a Zen master, ‘I’ve been tough on you because you’re very, very good.’ I wanted to sink down and embrace her knees.”

Peter Matthiessen, on his first novel.

Hablas español?  Nihongo o hanamasuka? Pratar du svenska? Congrats if you do, but no matter if you don’t thanks to the efforts of the most criminally under-appreciated class of craftsmen & women: the literary translators. But luckily Three Percent honors these brave crossers of language barriers annually via their Best Translated Book Award.  This year, authors from 20 different countries and writing in 16 languages were honored. Congrats to all, and we eagerly await the announcement of the shortlist & winner!
Complete list below; click here for ordering info: http://www.semcoop.com/best-translated-longlist
"Horses of God" by Mahi Binebine, translated from the French by Lulu Norman (Morocco; thetinhouse)"Blinding" by Mircea Cartarescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter (Romania; archipelagobooks)"Textile" by Orly Castel-Bloom, translated from the Hebrew by Dalya Bilu (Israel; thefeministpress)"Sleet" by Stig Dagerman, translated from the Swedish by Steven Hartman (Sweden; David R. Godine)"The Story of a New Name" by Elena Ferrante, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Italy; europaeditions)"Tirza" by Arnon Grunberg, translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett (Netherlands; Open Letter Books)"Her Not All Her" by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Austria; sylpheditions)"My Struggle: Book Two" by Karl Ove Knausgaard, translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett (Norway; archipelagobooks)"Seiobo There Below" by László Krasznahorkai, translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet (Hungary; newdirectionspublishing) "Autobiography of a Corpse" by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull (Ukraine; NYRB)"The Missing Year" of Juan Salvatierra by Pedro Mairal, translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor (Argentina; New Vessel Press)"The Infatuations" by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain; randomhouse)"A True Novel" by Minae Mizumura, translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters (Japan; otherpress)"In the Night of Time" by Antonio Muñoz Molina, translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman (Spain; hmhbooks)"The African Shore" by Rodrigo Rey Rosa, translated from the Spanish by Jeffrey Gray (Guatemala; yalepress)"Through the Night" by Stig Sæterbakken, translated from the Norwegian by Seán Kinsella (Norway; Dalkey Archive)"Commentary" by Marcelle Sauvageot, translated from the French by Christine Schwartz Hartley & Anna Moschovakis (France; uglyducklingpresse)"Leg Over Leg: Vol. 1" by Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, translated from the Arabic by Humphrey Davies (Lebanon; nyupress​)"The Whispering Muse" by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb (Iceland; fsgbooks)"The Forbidden Kingdom" by Jan Jacob Slauerhoff, translated from the Dutch by Paul Vincent (Netherlands; Pushkin Press)"The Devil’s Workshop" by Jáchym Topol, translated from the Czech by Alex Zucker (Czech Republic; Portobello Books)"The End of Love" by Marcos Giralt Torrente, translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver (Spain; McSweeney’s)"Red Grass" by Boris Vian, translated from the French by Paul Knobloch (France; Tam Tam Books)"City of Angels, or, The Overcoat of Dr. Freud" by Christa Wolf, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Germany; fsgbooks)"Sandalwood Death" by Mo Yan, translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt (China; University of Oklahoma Press)

Hablas españolNihongo o hanamasuka? Pratar du svenska? Congrats if you do, but no matter if you don’t thanks to the efforts of the most criminally under-appreciated class of craftsmen & women: the literary translators. But luckily Three Percent honors these brave crossers of language barriers annually via their Best Translated Book Award. This year, authors from 20 different countries and writing in 16 languages were honored. Congrats to all, and we eagerly await the announcement of the shortlist & winner!

Complete list below; click here for ordering info: http://www.semcoop.com/best-translated-longlist

"Horses of God" by Mahi Binebine, translated from the French by Lulu Norman (Morocco; thetinhouse)

"Blinding" by Mircea Cartarescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter (Romania; archipelagobooks)

"Textile" by Orly Castel-Bloom, translated from the Hebrew by Dalya Bilu (Israel; thefeministpress)

"Sleet" by Stig Dagerman, translated from the Swedish by Steven Hartman (Sweden; David R. Godine)

"The Story of a New Name" by Elena Ferrante, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Italy; europaeditions)

"Tirza" by Arnon Grunberg, translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett (Netherlands; Open Letter Books)

"Her Not All Her" by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Austria; sylpheditions)

"My Struggle: Book Two" by Karl Ove Knausgaard, translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett (Norway; archipelagobooks)

"Seiobo There Below" by László Krasznahorkai, translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet (Hungary; newdirectionspublishing)

"Autobiography of a Corpse" by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull (Ukraine; NYRB)

"The Missing Year" of Juan Salvatierra by Pedro Mairal, translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor (Argentina; New Vessel Press)

"The Infatuations" by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain; randomhouse)

"A True Novel" by Minae Mizumura, translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters (Japan; otherpress)

"In the Night of Time" by Antonio Muñoz Molina, translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman (Spain; hmhbooks)

"The African Shore" by Rodrigo Rey Rosa, translated from the Spanish by Jeffrey Gray (Guatemala; yalepress)

"Through the Night" by Stig Sæterbakken, translated from the Norwegian by Seán Kinsella (Norway; Dalkey Archive)

"Commentary" by Marcelle Sauvageot, translated from the French by Christine Schwartz Hartley & Anna Moschovakis (France; uglyducklingpresse)

"Leg Over Leg: Vol. 1" by Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, translated from the Arabic by Humphrey Davies (Lebanon; nyupress)

"The Whispering Muse" by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb (Iceland; fsgbooks)

"The Forbidden Kingdom" by Jan Jacob Slauerhoff, translated from the Dutch by Paul Vincent (Netherlands; Pushkin Press)

"The Devil’s Workshop" by Jáchym Topol, translated from the Czech by Alex Zucker (Czech Republic; Portobello Books)

"The End of Love" by Marcos Giralt Torrente, translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver (Spain; McSweeney’s)

"Red Grass" by Boris Vian, translated from the French by Paul Knobloch (France; Tam Tam Books)

"City of Angels, or, The Overcoat of Dr. Freud" by Christa Wolf, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Germany; fsgbooks)

"Sandalwood Death" by Mo Yan, translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt (China; University of Oklahoma Press)

"He dipped the pen into the ink and then faltered for just a second. A tremor had gone through his bowels. To mark the paper was the decisive act. In small clumsy letters he wrote: April 4, 1984."

George Orwell in 1984. Happy 30th birthday to Winston Smith’s diary

!

Happy National Poetry Month! We’re celebrating with a showcase of some of our favorite presses, who put out a whole lot of stuff worth reading — from classics to edgy new collections — & look great doing it.

Happy National Poetry Month! We’re celebrating with a showcase of some of our favorite presses, who put out a whole lot of stuff worth reading — from classics to edgy new collections — & look great doing it.

Happy Friday!
via critical-theory:

This photo of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre was taken in 1929 – the year the two philosophers first met – at the  Porte d’Orléans fairground in Paris. The photo is, according to Open Culture (via the French blog Avec Beauvoir) the first photo the couple took together. Sartre and Beauvoir would maintain a romantic and open relationship for the rest of their lives.

Happy Friday!

via critical-theory:

This photo of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre was taken in 1929 – the year the two philosophers first met – at the  Porte d’Orléans fairground in Paris. The photo is, according to Open Culture (via the French blog Avec Beauvoir) the first photo the couple took together. Sartre and Beauvoir would maintain a romantic and open relationship for the rest of their lives.

"Chicago is an October sort of city even in spring."

Author, Chicagoan, & weather prophet Nelson Algren would be 105 years old today!

Do you like books? Do you like punch?! ARE YOU FREE NEXT MONDAY 3/31 AT 7PM? Just say yes and join us at the venerable Punch House for an evening of literary delight with D. Foy (dfoyble), Ben Tanzer, and Susan Hope Lanier.

Read more about and/or order books:

D. Foy’s Made to Break

Ben Tanzer’s Lost in Space

For a limited time (i.e., while supplies last) you can call us 57th Street Books & RECORDS. Thanks to nytyrant and fatpossumrecords our stock now includes this book/7” limited edition package. Gathered together in shrink wrap, you’ll find Scott McClanahan’s Hill William (SIGNED!), his band Holler Boy’s record, and an audiobook download. This is not something you “want.” This is something you NEED.

For a limited time (i.e., while supplies last) you can call us 57th Street Books & RECORDS. Thanks to nytyrant and fatpossumrecords our stock now includes this book/7” limited edition package. Gathered together in shrink wrap, you’ll find Scott McClanahan’s Hill William (SIGNED!), his band Holler Boy’s record, and an audiobook download. This is not something you “want.” This is something you NEED.

penamerican:

In honor of Flannery O’Connor, who was born on this day in 1925, here are some of her thoughts on the joys and perils of reading and writing.
I write to discover what I know.Everywhere I go I’m asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them. There’s many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher.A story is a way to say something that can’t be said any other way, and it takes every word in the story to say what the meaning is.People without hope not only don’t write novels, but what is more to the point, they don’t read them.The writer should never be ashamed of staring. There is nothing that does not require his attention.

penamerican:

In honor of Flannery O’Connor, who was born on this day in 1925, here are some of her thoughts on the joys and perils of reading and writing.

I write to discover what I know.

Everywhere I go I’m asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them. There’s many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher.

A story is a way to say something that can’t be said any other way, and it takes every word in the story to say what the meaning is.

People without hope not only don’t write novels, but what is more to the point, they don’t read them.

The writer should never be ashamed of staring. There is nothing that does not require his attention.